For the 10th time in the last 11 years, a Carnegie Mellon University graduate has won a Tony Award. On Sunday, June 9, at Radio City Music Hall in New York City, Jamie deRoy earned a Tony for Best Play for “The Ferryman.” It is the 50th Tony for Carnegie Mellon alumni in the 73-year history of the ceremony, which honors the best on Broadway. Two CMU alumni earned Tony Honors, another

By Erin Keane Scott  Broadway experienced an unexpected first last fall: an all-female creative team assembled by alumna Leigh Silverman, mounted a production of “The Lifespan of a Fact” by journalist John D’Agatta. “I feel it is our responsibility as we gain power and any kind of platform, that we continue to widen the road as we go,” said Silverman, a 1996 CMU graduate. “This is my fourth Broadway show

Five Carnegie Mellon University School of Drama alumni received a total of 11 Tony Award nominations this morning for their Broadway work behind the scenes. This marks the 11th consecutive year that at least one Carnegie Mellon graduate has received a nomination. The nominations were announced at the Lincoln Center in New York. Producer Jamie deRoy, a 1967 Carnegie Mellon alumna, led the way with a total of six nominations in three categories. Tootsie,

“The title of University Professor is the highest designation a faculty member can receive at Carnegie Mellon. University Professors are distinguished by international recognition and for their contributions to education, artistic creativity and/or research,” wrote Carnegie Mellon University Provost James H. Garrett on Wednesday, May 1. “Each University Professor exemplifies a high level of professional achievement, and an exceptional commitment to academic excellence at our university.” Peter Cooke AM, Ph.D. was named among

by Joseph Hefner Could there be a living human being old enough to speak who hasn’t uttered some variation of those three little words?  You know the ones I mean—the words that can solidify a relationship… or destroy it entirely. The ones we may desperately want to declare, but for whatever reason, find ourselves unable to vocalize.  Or maybe they’re the words we say so often they’ve lost all meaning:

Alumnus Leslie Odom, Jr. will be the keynote speaker at Carnegie Mellon’s 2019 Commencement Ceremony on May, 19. Odom, who earned his bachelor’s degree from our College of Fine Arts in 2003, is a Tony and Grammy Award-winning actor, singer and dancer best known for his breakout role as Aaron Burr in the smash hit Broadway musical “Hamilton.” He won the Tony Award for Best Actor in a Musical for his performance in “Hamilton”

By Kate Hamilton Greeted by old-fashioned microphones, a piano, and an illuminated APPLAUSE sign, this February, the audience in the Helen Wayne Rauh Studio Theater was transported to 1940 to serve as the live studio audience for the Burns & Allen radio show. John Wells Directing Fellow Rachel Karp’s It’s in the Bag used comedienne Gracie Allen’s prank presidential run to track female presidential candidates through history. The result? A

by Pravin Wilkins Dark Play, by Carlos Murillo, tells the story of Nick, a friendless teenager who—in his isolation—turns to online chatrooms. What begins as a prank against Adam, another teenage boy whose online profile states that he “wants to fall in love,” morphs into a dangerous quest for acceptance through deception and manipulation. I had the opportunity to sit down with Director Adil Mansoor to parse through his team’s

January 18, 2019 By Erin Keane Scott E Geoff Marslett’s film, “The Phantom 52,” has been selected for the “Animated Short Films” category at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival, which takes place Jan. 24-Feb.3 in Park City, Utah. Marslett is an associate professor of film and television in Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Drama. “It feels a bit like buying a lotto ticket, but you hope,” said Marslett of his sixth attempt at submitting