Feb
28
Fri
Memory Habit @ Purnell Center for the Arts
Feb 28 @ 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Memory Habit @ Purnell Center for the Arts

Memory Habit
Adapted and directed by Eben Hoffer

Feb.26- 29

I can’t stop remembering; I don’t know if I would be what I am if I weren’t remembering. But I don’t know what I’m remembering. It’s just a reflex, like the haphazard breathing of a lungfish. It’s just a memory habit.

In the 1980s, a group of children of Holocaust survivors started to recognize that they were experiencing, what essentially amounted to PTSD. Chemically, their stress responses were similar to those of their parents’,¬¬ which were themselves similar to those of combat veterans. How could this be so, when these children themselves had been saved from the trauma of Nazi violence?

Performed by an unreliable pair of narrators, Memory Habit is a dual solo about intergenerational trauma: forgotten history, emerging (epi)genetic science, and how cultures attempt to survive and heal in the face of persistent haunting. If we are created by our ghosts, how are we to survive them? Is anyone more than a sum of their inheritance? Who do we decide has the right to their pain?

Into The Woods @ Purnell Center for the Arts
Feb 28 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Into The Woods @ Purnell Center for the Arts

Into The Woods

Music and Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim
Book by James Lapine
Directed and Choreographed by Matthew Gardiner
Music Direction by Rick Edinger

Feb. 20-29

Sometimes people leave you
Halfway through the wood
Others may deceive you
You decide what’s good
You decide alone
But no one is alone

What would you do to reverse a curse? How far would you go to make a wish come true? Into the Woods weaves familiar stories into a new tale that reaches the heart of what it means to come of age and follow your own moral compass for the first time.

Memory Habit @ Purnell Center for the Arts
Feb 28 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Memory Habit @ Purnell Center for the Arts

Memory Habit
Adapted and directed by Eben Hoffer

Feb.26- 29

I can’t stop remembering; I don’t know if I would be what I am if I weren’t remembering. But I don’t know what I’m remembering. It’s just a reflex, like the haphazard breathing of a lungfish. It’s just a memory habit.

In the 1980s, a group of children of Holocaust survivors started to recognize that they were experiencing, what essentially amounted to PTSD. Chemically, their stress responses were similar to those of their parents’,¬¬ which were themselves similar to those of combat veterans. How could this be so, when these children themselves had been saved from the trauma of Nazi violence?

Performed by an unreliable pair of narrators, Memory Habit is a dual solo about intergenerational trauma: forgotten history, emerging (epi)genetic science, and how cultures attempt to survive and heal in the face of persistent haunting. If we are created by our ghosts, how are we to survive them? Is anyone more than a sum of their inheritance? Who do we decide has the right to their pain?

Feb
29
Sat
Into The Woods @ Purnell Center for the Arts
Feb 29 @ 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Into The Woods @ Purnell Center for the Arts

Into The Woods

Music and Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim
Book by James Lapine
Directed and Choreographed by Matthew Gardiner
Music Direction by Rick Edinger

Feb. 20-29

Sometimes people leave you
Halfway through the wood
Others may deceive you
You decide what’s good
You decide alone
But no one is alone

What would you do to reverse a curse? How far would you go to make a wish come true? Into the Woods weaves familiar stories into a new tale that reaches the heart of what it means to come of age and follow your own moral compass for the first time.

Memory Habit @ Purnell Center for the Arts
Feb 29 @ 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Memory Habit @ Purnell Center for the Arts

Memory Habit
Adapted and directed by Eben Hoffer

Feb.26- 29

I can’t stop remembering; I don’t know if I would be what I am if I weren’t remembering. But I don’t know what I’m remembering. It’s just a reflex, like the haphazard breathing of a lungfish. It’s just a memory habit.

In the 1980s, a group of children of Holocaust survivors started to recognize that they were experiencing, what essentially amounted to PTSD. Chemically, their stress responses were similar to those of their parents’,¬¬ which were themselves similar to those of combat veterans. How could this be so, when these children themselves had been saved from the trauma of Nazi violence?

Performed by an unreliable pair of narrators, Memory Habit is a dual solo about intergenerational trauma: forgotten history, emerging (epi)genetic science, and how cultures attempt to survive and heal in the face of persistent haunting. If we are created by our ghosts, how are we to survive them? Is anyone more than a sum of their inheritance? Who do we decide has the right to their pain?

Into The Woods @ Purnell Center for the Arts
Feb 29 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Into The Woods @ Purnell Center for the Arts

Into The Woods

Music and Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim
Book by James Lapine
Directed and Choreographed by Matthew Gardiner
Music Direction by Rick Edinger

Feb. 20-29

Sometimes people leave you
Halfway through the wood
Others may deceive you
You decide what’s good
You decide alone
But no one is alone

What would you do to reverse a curse? How far would you go to make a wish come true? Into the Woods weaves familiar stories into a new tale that reaches the heart of what it means to come of age and follow your own moral compass for the first time.

Into The Woods @ Purnell Center for the Arts
Feb 29 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Into The Woods @ Purnell Center for the Arts

Into The Woods

Music and Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim
Book by James Lapine
Directed and Choreographed by Matthew Gardiner
Music Direction by Rick Edinger

Feb. 20-29

Sometimes people leave you
Halfway through the wood
Others may deceive you
You decide what’s good
You decide alone
But no one is alone

What would you do to reverse a curse? How far would you go to make a wish come true? Into the Woods weaves familiar stories into a new tale that reaches the heart of what it means to come of age and follow your own moral compass for the first time.

Memory Habit @ Purnell Center for the Arts
Feb 29 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Memory Habit @ Purnell Center for the Arts

Memory Habit
Adapted and directed by Eben Hoffer

Feb.26- 29

I can’t stop remembering; I don’t know if I would be what I am if I weren’t remembering. But I don’t know what I’m remembering. It’s just a reflex, like the haphazard breathing of a lungfish. It’s just a memory habit.

In the 1980s, a group of children of Holocaust survivors started to recognize that they were experiencing, what essentially amounted to PTSD. Chemically, their stress responses were similar to those of their parents’,¬¬ which were themselves similar to those of combat veterans. How could this be so, when these children themselves had been saved from the trauma of Nazi violence?

Performed by an unreliable pair of narrators, Memory Habit is a dual solo about intergenerational trauma: forgotten history, emerging (epi)genetic science, and how cultures attempt to survive and heal in the face of persistent haunting. If we are created by our ghosts, how are we to survive them? Is anyone more than a sum of their inheritance? Who do we decide has the right to their pain?

Apr
21
Tue
Desdemona’s Child @ Purnell Center for the Arts
Apr 21 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Desdemona's Child @ Purnell Center for the Arts

Desdemona’s Child
Caridad Svich
Directed by Adil Mansoor

April 20-26

 
What you’re born into
Has a way of catching up with you.
Even if you know it’s a lie.

We know them by different names, but we remember their stories all the same. Fierce O, gone, loved too much. Beautiful D, haunting, loved against themselves. Bitter I, stuck, doesn’t taste love. D child knows them by these names, but doesn’t remember the story pumping through their own blood. Desdemona’s Child (blood cry) dives into the ruin Othello left behind and the next generation struggling to keep afloat. Navigating a sunken past amidst a drowning present, D child seeks to reconcile truth with memory.

Desdemona’s Child (blood cry) exists in the eye of the storm, or our bated breath as we wait for the flood to wash over and drown us too. Desdemona’s Child (blood cry) asks of us the same questions D child asks of themselves: How do we survive histories built on oppression? How do we contend with legacies we’re born into? How do we begin to heal when trauma’s inked into our being?

*This production is a developmental iteration of Desdemona’s Child and Mansoor’s MFA Thesis.

Apr
22
Wed
Desdemona’s Child @ Purnell Center for the Arts
Apr 22 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Desdemona's Child @ Purnell Center for the Arts

Desdemona’s Child
Caridad Svich
Directed by Adil Mansoor

April 20-26

 
What you’re born into
Has a way of catching up with you.
Even if you know it’s a lie.

We know them by different names, but we remember their stories all the same. Fierce O, gone, loved too much. Beautiful D, haunting, loved against themselves. Bitter I, stuck, doesn’t taste love. D child knows them by these names, but doesn’t remember the story pumping through their own blood. Desdemona’s Child (blood cry) dives into the ruin Othello left behind and the next generation struggling to keep afloat. Navigating a sunken past amidst a drowning present, D child seeks to reconcile truth with memory.

Desdemona’s Child (blood cry) exists in the eye of the storm, or our bated breath as we wait for the flood to wash over and drown us too. Desdemona’s Child (blood cry) asks of us the same questions D child asks of themselves: How do we survive histories built on oppression? How do we contend with legacies we’re born into? How do we begin to heal when trauma’s inked into our being?

*This production is a developmental iteration of Desdemona’s Child and Mansoor’s MFA Thesis.