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Memory Habit

This event is part of the CMU School of Drama's Director's Series. For more information, please click here.

Memory Habit


Adapted and directed by Eben Hoffer
Feb. 26-29

I can’t stop remembering; I don’t know if I would be what I am if I weren’t remembering. But I don’t know what I’m remembering. It’s just a reflex, like the haphazard breathing of a lungfish. It’s just a memory habit.

In the 1980s, a group of children of Holocaust survivors started to recognize that they were experiencing, what essentially amounted to PTSD. Chemically, their stress responses were similar to those of their parents’,¬¬ which were themselves similar to those of combat veterans. How could this be so, when these children themselves had been saved from the trauma of Nazi violence?

Performed by an unreliable pair of narrators,Memory Habit is a dual solo about intergenerational trauma: forgotten history, emerging (epi)genetic science, and how cultures attempt to survive and heal in the face of persistent haunting. If we are created by our ghosts, how are we to survive them? Is anyone more than a sum of their inheritance? Who do we decide has the right to their pain?

Feb
26
Wed
Memory Habit @ Purnell Center for the Arts
Feb 26 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Memory Habit @ Purnell Center for the Arts

Memory Habit

Adapted and directed by Eben Hoffer
Feb.26- 29

I can’t stop remembering; I don’t know if I would be what I am if I weren’t remembering. But I don’t know what I’m remembering. It’s just a reflex, like the haphazard breathing of a lungfish. It’s just a memory habit.

In the 1980s, a group of children of Holocaust survivors started to recognize that they were experiencing, what essentially amounted to PTSD. Chemically, their stress responses were similar to those of their parents’,­­ which were themselves similar to those of combat veterans. How could this be so, when these children themselves had been saved from the trauma of Nazi violence?

Performed by an unreliable pair of narrators, Memory Habit is a dual solo about intergenerational trauma: forgotten history, emerging (epi)genetic science, and how cultures attempt to survive and heal in the face of persistent haunting. If we are created by our ghosts, how are we to survive them? Is anyone more than a sum of their inheritance? Who do we decide has the right to their pain?

Feb
27
Thu
Memory Habit @ Purnell Center for the Arts
Feb 27 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Memory Habit @ Purnell Center for the Arts

Memory Habit
Adapted and directed by Eben Hoffer

Feb.26- 29

I can’t stop remembering; I don’t know if I would be what I am if I weren’t remembering. But I don’t know what I’m remembering. It’s just a reflex, like the haphazard breathing of a lungfish. It’s just a memory habit.

In the 1980s, a group of children of Holocaust survivors started to recognize that they were experiencing, what essentially amounted to PTSD. Chemically, their stress responses were similar to those of their parents’,¬¬ which were themselves similar to those of combat veterans. How could this be so, when these children themselves had been saved from the trauma of Nazi violence?

Performed by an unreliable pair of narrators, Memory Habit is a dual solo about intergenerational trauma: forgotten history, emerging (epi)genetic science, and how cultures attempt to survive and heal in the face of persistent haunting. If we are created by our ghosts, how are we to survive them? Is anyone more than a sum of their inheritance? Who do we decide has the right to their pain?

Feb
28
Fri
Memory Habit @ Purnell Center for the Arts
Feb 28 @ 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Memory Habit @ Purnell Center for the Arts

Memory Habit
Adapted and directed by Eben Hoffer

Feb.26- 29

I can’t stop remembering; I don’t know if I would be what I am if I weren’t remembering. But I don’t know what I’m remembering. It’s just a reflex, like the haphazard breathing of a lungfish. It’s just a memory habit.

In the 1980s, a group of children of Holocaust survivors started to recognize that they were experiencing, what essentially amounted to PTSD. Chemically, their stress responses were similar to those of their parents’,¬¬ which were themselves similar to those of combat veterans. How could this be so, when these children themselves had been saved from the trauma of Nazi violence?

Performed by an unreliable pair of narrators, Memory Habit is a dual solo about intergenerational trauma: forgotten history, emerging (epi)genetic science, and how cultures attempt to survive and heal in the face of persistent haunting. If we are created by our ghosts, how are we to survive them? Is anyone more than a sum of their inheritance? Who do we decide has the right to their pain?

Memory Habit @ Purnell Center for the Arts
Feb 28 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Memory Habit @ Purnell Center for the Arts

Memory Habit
Adapted and directed by Eben Hoffer

Feb.26- 29

I can’t stop remembering; I don’t know if I would be what I am if I weren’t remembering. But I don’t know what I’m remembering. It’s just a reflex, like the haphazard breathing of a lungfish. It’s just a memory habit.

In the 1980s, a group of children of Holocaust survivors started to recognize that they were experiencing, what essentially amounted to PTSD. Chemically, their stress responses were similar to those of their parents’,¬¬ which were themselves similar to those of combat veterans. How could this be so, when these children themselves had been saved from the trauma of Nazi violence?

Performed by an unreliable pair of narrators, Memory Habit is a dual solo about intergenerational trauma: forgotten history, emerging (epi)genetic science, and how cultures attempt to survive and heal in the face of persistent haunting. If we are created by our ghosts, how are we to survive them? Is anyone more than a sum of their inheritance? Who do we decide has the right to their pain?

Feb
29
Sat
Memory Habit @ Purnell Center for the Arts
Feb 29 @ 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Memory Habit @ Purnell Center for the Arts

Memory Habit
Adapted and directed by Eben Hoffer

Feb.26- 29

I can’t stop remembering; I don’t know if I would be what I am if I weren’t remembering. But I don’t know what I’m remembering. It’s just a reflex, like the haphazard breathing of a lungfish. It’s just a memory habit.

In the 1980s, a group of children of Holocaust survivors started to recognize that they were experiencing, what essentially amounted to PTSD. Chemically, their stress responses were similar to those of their parents’,¬¬ which were themselves similar to those of combat veterans. How could this be so, when these children themselves had been saved from the trauma of Nazi violence?

Performed by an unreliable pair of narrators, Memory Habit is a dual solo about intergenerational trauma: forgotten history, emerging (epi)genetic science, and how cultures attempt to survive and heal in the face of persistent haunting. If we are created by our ghosts, how are we to survive them? Is anyone more than a sum of their inheritance? Who do we decide has the right to their pain?

Memory Habit @ Purnell Center for the Arts
Feb 29 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Memory Habit @ Purnell Center for the Arts

Memory Habit
Adapted and directed by Eben Hoffer

Feb.26- 29

I can’t stop remembering; I don’t know if I would be what I am if I weren’t remembering. But I don’t know what I’m remembering. It’s just a reflex, like the haphazard breathing of a lungfish. It’s just a memory habit.

In the 1980s, a group of children of Holocaust survivors started to recognize that they were experiencing, what essentially amounted to PTSD. Chemically, their stress responses were similar to those of their parents’,¬¬ which were themselves similar to those of combat veterans. How could this be so, when these children themselves had been saved from the trauma of Nazi violence?

Performed by an unreliable pair of narrators, Memory Habit is a dual solo about intergenerational trauma: forgotten history, emerging (epi)genetic science, and how cultures attempt to survive and heal in the face of persistent haunting. If we are created by our ghosts, how are we to survive them? Is anyone more than a sum of their inheritance? Who do we decide has the right to their pain?